THE VAULT

CURRENT EXHIBITION:

LAUREN LOVELESS X LUCY POOK

LAUREN LOVELESS

 

 

Sweet and tender, gentle and kind, with an ocean of fire running through their veins. The power of women loving women is a beautiful thing, like the moon caressing the ocean into waves. 

“For just gazing at you for a second, it is impossible for me even to talk;
my tongue is broken, all at once a soft
flame has stolen beneath my flesh” Sappho 

This is one work in a collection of paintings devoted to the celebration of Lesbian love; dedicated to my dearest friends and inspired by the fierce passion, synergy, devotion and adoration that they have for each other. 

Lucy Pook

 

Lucy Pook is an artist living and working between Kent and London. Peripatetic in both location and medium, her work sits outside a classic media-based approach, connected through the poetry of a visual Chinese whispers.

Found objects and images, strung together with word association, create an ‘exquisite corps’ of outcomes. Drawing without looking at the page, binding together phrases over-heard, with disembodied, highly refined, yonic pencil drawing, skip to boldly coloured negative space and/or the absence of object.

Magpieing her way through her artistic practice, Lucy has one object…to pay attention. To scrutinize the world around her and make links….’Whisht Woman’ the title of her most recent work, a phrase remembered from an old boyfriend, mimics the sound of a fan fluttering with erotic anticipation.

Obsessed with certain people, places, perfectly designed objects, and a nostalgia for places she has never been…..Debra Winger, Novia Scotia, the Opinel knife, Lucy has a conversation with us about the wonder of the World, from popular culture to idiosyncratic pleasures.

‘Love Island’ becomes a fertile ground for abstraction, the transcription of an entire episode, minus the punctuation renders the narrative a stream of conscientiousness poem of beautiful nonsense, the summer of the 2019 ‘Under-boob’ phenomena becomes the basis for an abstract play with the notion of colour palette.

Lucy’s work is playful and inquisitive, and not to be taken seriously….apart from when it is.